Our Grantees in the News 2017-02-10T10:39:25+00:00

Our Grantees in the News

 

 

Aimee Dunkle featured in Los Angeles Times

As need grows for painkiller overdose treatment, companies raise prices, July 2016

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“Aimee Dunkle began helping to distribute the drug naloxone — the life-saving antidote to prescription painkiller overdoses — after her son died.
Ben Dunkle, 20, was with three people when he overdosed in 2012, she said. She believes he would be alive today if they had naloxone.”

Read the whole article, As need grows for painkiller overdose treatment, companies raise prices here.

Learn more about Aimee Dunkle’s project, The Solace Foundation, here.

Corinne Hindes on J Weekly.com

jweekly_logoDiller Teen turns lost ski gear into clothing for homeless, July 2016

“When Corinne Hindes was 11, she saw a man in her hometown of Walnut Creek wearing nothing but a T-shirt and a pair of ripped jeans on the coldest day of the year. She had started to notice the homeless people in her area that year, but seeing this man enduring the cold without warm clothes stuck with her.”

“She was also pretty sure she knew how to help.”

Read the whole article, Diller Teen turns lost ski gear into clothing for homeless here.

Learn more about Corinne Hindes and Katrine Kirsebom here.

Padmanaban Gopalan in India’s Hindustan Times

hindusan timesNo Food Waste: When leftovers reach the hungry through a mobile app, July 2016

“As Guna Sekaran and Ashwin Narayan unload the food packets, a small crowd gathers, mostly of children under 12. They seem shy, almost retreating. But as the packets are handed out, a bit of jostling begins and their eyes light up at the sight of what’s inside — four chapatis and a generous portion of mixed vegetable. Wordlessly, they sit on the floor and tuck in.”

“I haven’t eaten anything since morning,” 11-year-old Neha Kaneria says in between mouthfuls as she also feeds her little brother. Their mother, a domestic help, doesn’t have the time to cook for them most days, she lets in.

“It’s the same for most of the children here at this temple basement in Noida Sector 55, where they attend an informal school. Sekaran, 28, and Narayan, 27, are volunteers with No Food Waste, a social start-up working to address urban hunger.”

Read the whole article, No Food Waste: When leftovers reach the hungry through a mobile app here.

Learn more about Padmanaban Gopalan here.

Corinne Hindes in the National Jewish newspaper Forward

ForwardThis Teen Who Helps Clothe the Homeless Will Warm Your Heart, July 2016

“When I was 11 years old, I came upon a homeless man near my house, dressed in just a t-shirt and jeans, on what was by far, the coldest day of the year. I couldn’t believe that he didn’t even have a coat to keep him warm, and I knew I had to find a way to help him. My best friend Katrine and I were ski racers, and one weekend during practice we went to the lost and found to look for a hat I had misplaced. We were shocked to see huge piles of unclaimed coats, hats, gloves, and scarves, and I immediately thought of that homeless man near my house with no coat at all. We asked the ski resort if we could take those unclaimed items to our local homeless shelter, and that day in 2011, Warm Winters was born.”

Read the whole article, This Teen Who Helps Clothe the Homeless Will Warm Your Heart here.

Learn more about Corinne Hindes and Katrine Kirsebom here.

Mark Devries in Wonderful Engineering

wonderful eThis Drone Just Exposed One Of America’s Biggest Environmental Secrets in Wonderful Engineering, July 2016

“Smithfield Foods is in big trouble following a drone exposing how vile the environmental practices are at one of the pig farms located in North Carolina. Filmmaker Mark Devries is the person who flew the drone over the hidden farm to find out what is going on behind the thick forest that surrounds and covers the farm. The drone was able to film a huge cess pool about the size of four football field beside the warehouse that is packed with thousands of pigs.”

Read the whole article, This Drone Just Exposed One Of America’s Biggest Environmental Secrets.

Learn more about, Mark Devries here.

Purity Wanjohi in Daily Nation

daily-nationMazingira Safi: Making Nairobi clean again, July 2016

“I have an undergraduate degree in microbiology and biotechnology. I was set for a career in the health care or pharmaceutical industry. Then just before graduation, I took up a part-time job as a waitress at a restaurant. While here, I got to meet an interesting breed of people. People who seemed utterly content with their lives and happy with their jobs. I knew that the path my degree was taking me towards would not make me happy, so I quit the waitressing job and took some time to do some soul-searching. It opened my eyes to just how dirty Nairobi was, so I immediately registered my foundation and went back to school for a master’s in environmental planning and management to get the skills I needed…”

Read the whole article, Mazingira Safi: Making Nairobi clean again here.

Learn more about Purity Wanjohi here.

Precious Stroud featured in NBPC

NBPC Artists-in-Residence at NALIP Summit, Flaherty Seminar, July 2016

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“Congrats to NBPC’s talented artists-in-residence, Precious Stroud and Melissa Haizlip, for their recent participation in two prominent workshops for content creators! This weekend, Precious — creator of the Black Female Project — took part as an NBPC scholar at the annual Media Summit of the National Association for Latino Independent Producers (NALIP). The summit celebrates Latino creatives and challenges its participants to redefine the future of storytelling.”

Read the whole article, NBPC Artists-in-Residence at NALIP Summit, Flaherty Seminar here.

Learn more about Precious Stroud’s project, BlackFemaleProject , here.

Tsechu Dolma in Wild Gift, empowering better world entrepreneurs

world-gift2016 Wild Gift Fellowship, July 2016

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“My bold, entrepreneurial spirit has brought me back to the country I left behind, Nepal. Finding gaps in the existing infrastructures, I make deep­investment in small­scale, doable solutions to development challenges. Such as a greenhouse, which is not a revolutionary idea by itself, but combined with a school curriculum, business model and local investment, it becomes an incubator for social innovation, financial inclusion and capacity development. I am bold in optimizing the existing resources to serve the needs of a community through Mountain Resiliency Project.”

Read the whole article, 2016 Wild Gift Fellowship here.

Learn more about Tsechu Dolma’s project, Building Climate Change Resilience in Nepal’s Himalayas, Nepal, here.

Jacob Savage featured in SF Homeless Project

Cause for Concrn, June 2016

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“Jacob Savage can’t meet me in his office, which is temporarily housed in the Indochinese Housing Development Corporation, because the space is being used as a kids’ summer camp. Instead, he asks if we can meet nearby at the San Francisco City Impact Thrift Store, a small space in the heart of the Tenderloin. When he shows up, he is carrying a trumpet in one hand. There is also a slide whistle — the kind given out at kid birthday parties — sticking out of his back pocket. “Hey man, I’ve met you before,” one of the store’s employees says to him. “On the street. You were playing that thing,” he says, pointing to the trumpet.”

Read the whole article, Cause for Concrn here.

Learn more about Jacob Savage’s project, Concrn here.

Melanie Cross featured on the Voice of Evolution Radio

voice revolution radioThe Other Side Global Drama Exchange: Creating Connection Through Story, June 2016

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” The Other Side creates a cross-cultural exchange of dramatic storytelling amongst girls, supporting their common experience, inspiring leadership, and developing community. In this most recent drama exchange on Voice of Evolution Radio, Pinkie, a young woman at Pardada-Pardadi Educational Society  in Anupsharhr, Uttar Pradesh, India and another young women, attending college in NYC, in United States share their stories of being female in two very different, and often similar cultures. 

Read the whole article and listen to the interview, The Other Side Global Drama Exchange: Creating Connection Through Story here.

Learn more about Melanie Cross’s project, The Other Side Educational Theatre, here.

Aimee Dunkle featured in The Orange County Register

O.C. nonprofit: After 117 lives saved, we’re running out of drug that blocks heroin overdoses, June 2016

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“On Saturday, an Orange County nonprofit will run out of a heroin-blocking medication that it distributes weekly, eliminating the county’s only free supply of a drug the group says has revived at least 117 people from overdoses over the past four months. Since late February, the Solace Foundation, working with the Orange County Needle Exchange Program, has distributed 610 kits of naloxone at the Santa Ana Civic Center. The drug has provided heroin users with an easy-to-administer medication that blocks the effects of opiates, reversing potentially fatal overdoses in seconds.”

Read the whole article, O.C. nonprofit: After 117 lives saved, we’re running out of drug that blocks heroin overdoses here.

Learn more about Aimee Dunkle’s project, The Solace Foundation, here.

Kate Franzman in Indianapolis’s Farm Indiana

farm-indianaBee Friendly, June 2016

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“From her humble beginnings on an abandoned DeKalb County farm to her present status as a full-on honeybee advocate and urban farmer, Kate Franzman, founder of Bee Public, is on a mission. And it’s not about the honey. For Franzman, saving bees, a vital aspect of Indiana’s food chain, starts by raising awareness. Through her organization, Bee Public, she’s doing it one school, one hive and one city at a time.”

“Growing up on a farm in Indiana in the 1970s, I remember honeybees were everywhere, but we just don’t seem to have them like we used to. Do you have memories of encountering bees as a child? Yes, that’s how my childhood was, but how soon we forget, right, that the world used to literally be crawling with bees, and to be stung as you were running through the clover was just something that happened? It wasn’t a big deal, because bees were everywhere. Where I grew up, we had fruit trees, the fruit would fall to the ground and begin to rot and attract all kind of bugs, including bees, and it’s just something I grew up being around. I was totally a free-range child, running around on this abandoned farm.”

Read the whole article, Bee Friendly here.

Learn more about Kate Franzman’s project, Bee Public, here.

Devi Vaisya featured in Colorlines

‘Peacock Rebellion’ Empowers Queer Comics of Color to Find Their Voices , June 2016

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“For “Peacock Rebellion” co-creator Manish Vaidya, stand-up comedy isn’t just entertainment—it’s a space for healing, empowerment and social change. 
“People are open to so much when they are coming to be entertained,” said the Bay Area-based performer and organizer, who identifies as non-binary and uses the pronoun “they.” “There’s so much radical potential there.”
As they described in a new story from KQED, Vaidya turned to comedy to deal with their struggles as a “scrawny Hindu, queer, closeted, disabled kid in Catholic school in a really White town where one of the main extracurricular activities was the KKK.” They created Peacock Rebellion, a collective of artists and activists that brings queer people of color together for creative events and workshops that build community. One of those workshops, Brouhaha, trains participants in stand-up comedy and offers performance opportunities in popular stand-up showcases.”

Read the whole article, ‘Peacock Rebellion’ Empowers Queer Comics of Color to Find Their Voices here.

Learn more about Devi Vaisya’s project, Brouhaha here.

Natalie Kyriacou in startup smart

startup-smartThis Melbourne conservationist-turned-entrepreneur has created an app aiming to help save the environment, June 2016

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“A Melbourne conservationist-turned-entrepreneur has created an app aiming to have a real-world impact on the environment. Following years of dedicated volunteer work around the world and the launch of her social enterprise My Green World in 2013, Natalie Kyriacou embarked on her next big mission: a smartphone app that she says could change the world. After seeing the addictive power of simple apps like Angry Birds, Kyriacou looked to convert the time people spend on these games into positive impacts in the real world.”

Read the whole article, This Melbourne conservationist-turned-entrepreneur has created an app aiming to help save the environment here.

Learn more about Natalie Kyriacou’s project, My Green World, here.

Devi Vaisya featured in KQED Arts

How a Closeted Queer Kid Created a Comedy Community, June 2016

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“Growing up, Manish Vaidya used comedy for survival. “I was this scrawny Hindu, queer, closeted, disabled kid in Catholic school in a really white town where one of the main extracurricular activities was the KKK,” the artist and community organizer says. “I do not know how I would’ve made it through without cracking jokes,” they add. (Vaidya is non-binary and prefers the gender neutral pronoun “they”).

As the cocreator of Peacock Rebellion, a Bay Area group of artist-activist-healers, Vaidya brings together queer trans people of color (QTPOC) for creative workshops, events — and a very unusual comedy training program.”

Read the whole article, How a Closeted Queer Kid Created a Comedy Community here.

Learn more about Devi Vaisya’s project, Brouhaha here.

Juan Freitez Mora featured in PRI

Coming out twice: Once as undocumented, and then as gay, June 2016

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“He was a junior in high school. His economics teacher had planned a trip to Hawai’i for an academic decathlon. In order to go, Bailón had to fill out a form. In order to fill out the form, he needed a social security number. He didn’t have one. “I realized at that moment that I was not going to be able to be part of the program and that there was going to be more barriers to come,” he recalls. It made him feel like he was the only person who was facing those kinds of problems. “I just kind of shut down,” Bailón says. But a couple of years later, a law passed by President Barack Obama — Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) — helped Bailón stay in the US. “

Read the whole article, Coming out twice: Once as undocumented, and then as gay here.

Learn more about Juan Freitez Mora’s project, Community Grassroots Media, here.

Carol-Ann Nelson featured in the Duke Orthopaedics News

Carol-Ann Nelson, PT, DPT, founder of nonprofit organization, Destination Rehab, has been awarded a seed grant from The Pollination Project, June 2016

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“Carol-Ann Nelson, PT, DPT (Duke DPT Class of 2013), Founder and Executive Director of Destination Rehab, has been awarded a seed grant from The Pollination Project. Destination Rehab is an adventure based rehabilitation for people with neurologic disabilities, based in Bend, Oregon. They take their participants into the community to practice real-life skills while enjoying challenging outdoor activities.”

Read the whole article, Carol-Ann Nelson, PT, DPT, founder of nonprofit organization, Destination Rehab, has been awarded a seed grant from The Pollination Project, here.

Learn more about Carol-Ann Nelson’s project, Adventure Based Rehab, here.

Angeline Makore in Women Deliver

women-deliver4 Young Africans Who Are Changing the World, June 2016

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“The last few days have been full of meaningful deliberations and conversations around global development issues. Just last month, I was at the World Economic Forum on Africa in Kigali, Rwanda, where I had the honour of being one of the co-chairs. We talked about the various strategies to transform Africa. As is expected, making the most of Africa’s demographic dividend was one of the key themes that were discussed.”

Read the whole article, 4 Young Africans Who Are Changing the World, here.

Learn more about Angeline Makore’s Project, Community Girls Club, here.

Claudia Bernardi in California’s Del Norte Triplicate

Del norteThe dance of mural painting, June 2016

“Dozens of eyes regarded the panels against the windows.”

“They were the blank canvasses for the Yurok Tribe’s new mural, but before they could start, the artists had to introduce themselves to the panels. Swirls of crimson, fuchsia and turquoise flowed from their sponges. Three-year-old Casius Clay left indigo handprints. His mother, Lori Risling, drew a magenta heart with her finger.”

“Claudia Bernardi, who guided participants through the mural process, applauded as they filled the blank with a mosaic of color. Although their work wouldn’t stay, Bernardi congratulated the artists on a good start.”

Read the whole article, The dance of mural painting here.

Learn more about Claudia Bernardi here.

Angeline Makore in the World Economic Forum

world economic forum4 young Africans who are changing the world, June 2016

“The last few days have been full of meaningful deliberations and conversations around global development issues. Just last month, I was at the World Economic Forum on Africa in Kigali, Rwanda, where I had the honour of being one of the co-chairs. We talked about the various strategies to transform Africa. As is expected, making the most of Africa’s demographic dividend was one of the key themes that were discussed.”

“Angeline is an exceptional young leader from Zimbabwe, who is passionate about the health and well-being of women and girls in her country. As a young person, she was involved in rescuing child marriage victims and sexually abused girls, and offered psychosocial support to teenage mothers. This inspired her to work on reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health (RMNCAH) issues as a volunteer at Girl Child Network Zimbabwe.”

Read the whole article, 4 young Africans who are changing the world here.

Learn more about Angeline Makore here.

Stuart Richardson featured in Peninsula Press

peninsula press logoBountiful Churchyards cultivates community through urban farming, May 2016

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“The University Lutheran Church (UniLu), at the corner of Bowdoin and Stanford Avenue in Palo Alto, welcomes local students and members of the community to foster volunteering and spiritual development. But it is the garden located at the back of the property that makes this church unique in its mission and day-to-day operations. Last year, Vicar Stu Richardson created Bountiful Churchyards to help churches and nonprofits plant edible gardens across the Bay Area. They hope to make local, healthy food more accessible to those who need it most. Stu Richardson is the church’s executive director and Bountiful Churchyards’ founder. (Jamie Stark/Peninsula Press) “Our vision is to provide a welcoming space for people with limited resources to grow or glean food for themselves and their families within walking distances of where they are living,” Richardson said.”

Read the whole article and watch the video, Bountiful Churchyards cultivates community through urban farming here.

Learn more about Stuart Richardson’s project, Seeding Bountiful Churchyards, here.

Hayu Patria featured on BBC, Indonesia

Hayu Dyah, meneliti tanaman liar untuk makanan sehari-hari, May 2016

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“Dusun Mendira dikenal sebagai dusun miskin, tetapi bagi peneliti tanaman liar Hayu Dyah, desa itu luar biasa kaya. Bersama ibu-ibu, mereka membudidayakan tanaman liar yang bernutrisi untuk makanan sehari-hari. Christine Franciska dan Haryo Wirawan bertemu mereka dan menceritakan kisahnya.”

Read the whole article and watch the video, Hayu Dyah, meneliti tanaman liar untuk makanan sehari-hari here.

Learn more about Hayu Patria’s project, Our Seeds, Our Future, here.

Marie Culver in The Virginian-Pilot

The Virginia PilotHer educational gardens, May 2016

“Gifted resource teacher Marie Culver arrived at Seatack Elementary School in Virginia Beach seven years ago with her mud boots on and her spade in hand.

Before Culver’s first year was over, the Seatack courtyard was recognized as a National Wildlife Federation Certified Wildlife Habitat. That was just the start. Culver has been leading the school community down the green path of caring for the environment ever since.”

Read the whole article, her educational gardens here.

Learn more about Grantee Marie Culver here.

Jaha Dukureh on WABE 90.1

Closer Look: Ending Female Genital Mutilation; And More, May 2016

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“Jaha Dukureh, founder of Safe Hands for Girls, speaks about her work to end female genital mutilation on ”Closer Look.””

Listen the interview, Closer Look: Ending Female Genital Mutilation; And More, here.

Learn more about Jaha Dukureh’s project, Campaign to End Female Genital Mutilation  here.

Lauren Griffiths featured on 4 WWL TV

4WWLTV logoLocal grad students help teach sustainability, healthy cooking choices, May 2016

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“A group of public health graduates is working to help people with chronic illness in a way that doesn’t include the usual medicine — working with them in the kitchen.Graduate students at the LSU School of Public Health had an idea. Take some campus green space for a vegetable garden and teach patients from University Medical Center with chronic health problems how to grow their own food and then create healthful dishes.”Food is medicine,” Jasmine Meyer said. Meyer is an LSUHSC public health student who is graduating with her master’s degree in May.

Read the whole article and watch the video, Local grad students help teach sustainability, healthy cooking choices here.

Learn more about Lauren Griffiths’ project, The Raised Root Student Garden, here.

Aimee Dunkle featured in NBC Los Angeles

Orange County Mom Campaigns for Overdose-Reversal Shot, May 2016

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“Aimee Dunkle will tell her story to anyone who will listen — it’s a story filled with the heartache of a mother who lost her 20-year-old son, Ben, to a heroin overdose.
‘The big thing was the shock that somebody like him could die,’ she said. ‘They just didn’t expect it.’ “

Read the whole article, Orange County Mom Campaigns for Overdose-Reversal Shot here.

Learn more about Aimee Dunkle’s project, The Solace Foundation, here.

Doniece Sandoval in San Francisco State University’s El Tecolote

El TecoloteLava Mae founder recognized for her positive impact, May 2016

“Doniece Sandoval, having seen the conditions of people living on the street, founded Lava Mae, an organization that provides buses retrofitted with showers and bathrooms for the homeless. For her efforts, she was one of six to be recognized at Hispanicize’s Positive Impact Awards, the annual gathering of Latino journalists, tech entrepreneurs and digital content creators.”

“One day I passed a young woman on the street, she was crying that she’d never be clean, and I wondered what her chances were of getting clean,” Sandoval said. “I went home that night and researched and found out that there were 16 showers [for] over 3,500 people living on the streets to use. I just thought that was appalling. This is a first-world country. San Francisco is one of the most affluent cities in the world and we have issues with water and sanitation, which is shocking.”

Read the whole article, Lava Mae founder recognized for her positive impact here.

Learn more about Doniece Sandoval here.

Sitawa Wafula in Ventures Africa

ventures africa42 African Innovators To Watch 2016 Edition, May 2016

“Last year Ventures Africa published 40 African Innovators to Watch and this year, the astounding talent pushed us to feature 42 innovators this time around. 42 African Innovators to Watch seeks to reposition how we consider innovation on the continent and by extension what it means to be an innovator. Each of the individuals we spotlight, share a commitment to something simultaneously infinite, yet quantifiable: change.”

Read the whole article, 42 African Innovators To Watch 2016 Edition here.

Learn more about Sitawa Wafula here.

Doniece Sandoval in the San Francisco Chronicle

San Francisco ChronicleHardworking heroes move faster than City Hall to help homeless, April 2016

“Within view of the mayor’s balcony at City Hall last week was a display of fast-moving, innovative, entrepreneurial work about homelessness. Say what?”

“We’ve told you before about Lava Mae, the nonprofit started less than three years ago to turn decommissioned Muni buses into mobile shower stalls for homeless people. It’s time for another check-in because in that short time, the organization has been copied around the world, has plans to expand to San Jose and Los Angeles, and has launched a Pop-Up Care Village. It was on display for the first time Tuesday next to the Main Library and furthers Lava Mae’s goal of “radical hospitality” for the homeless.”

Read the whole article, Hardworking heroes move faster than City Hall to help homeless here.

Learn more about Doniece Sandoval here.

Lauren Vining in Kentucky’s The Pioneer News

the pioneer newsFreedom teacher takes lessons learned to help show new ways to foreign educators, April 2016

“A local educator, hoping to see all teachers find similar success through shared platforms, ideas and resources, travelled to Africa during Spring Break to kickstart that success.”

“Freedom Elementary instructor Lauren Vining co-founded and established Pink Elephant, a non-profit organization dedicated to educating, mentoring and supporting teachers worldwide, especially in disadvantaged communities.”

“We want to connect all teachers in a global support system,” she said.

Read the whole article, Freedom teacher takes lessons learned to help show new ways to foreign educators here.

Learn more about Lauren Vining here.