Our Grantees in the News 2017-10-05T17:52:00+00:00

Our Grantees in the News

 

 

Molly Beth Rice featured in Peoria Magazine.com

Women of Influence: Heart, Mind & Soul, December 2017

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” I was recently blessed to get to know four unique, beautiful and brilliant women from our community—amazing individuals who are redefining what it means to shape and influence the community around us. They are thinking and living “outside the box,” breaking out of the traditional mold, and uplifting the communities, businesses and families in our region—and each of them has been a big inspiration to me… Molly Rice was born in Peoria, attending Woodruff High School, Illinois Central College and Bradley University. After working for several years with different social service organizations, then at Bradley, she moved to the small town of Rushville, where she met and married Mike Rice, a single father to three daughters. After learning about a shortage of foster parents, they became licensed in 2013. They had room to house more children, and they both had a drive to help others.”

Read the whole article, Women of Influence: Heart, Mind & Soul, here.

Learn more about Molly Beth Rice’s project, Good Soil for the Peoria North End Urban Garden, here.

Dr. Amie Breeze Harper featured in The New York Times

Black Vegans Step Out, for Their Health and Other Causes, November 2017

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“Aph Ko got tired of hearing that eating vegan was something only white people did. So in 2015, she created a list of 100 black vegans for a website. It included pioneering figures like Dick Gregory and Coretta Scott King and younger, less famous writers, filmmakers, cooks and activists. “When you say ‘vegan,’ a lot of people tend to only think of PETA, which doesn’t reflect the massive landscape of vegan activism,” said Ms. Ko, 28, a Floridian whose favorite dish at the moment is the spinach pie in “The Vegan Stoner Cookbook.” “The black vegan movement is one of the most diverse, decolonial, complex and creative movements.” So many other people wanted to be included on the list after it appeared, she started a website, Black Vegans Rock. That spawned a Twitter hashtag (#blackvegansrock) and a T-shirt business. In June, she published ”Aphro-ism: Essays on Pop Culture, Feminism, and Black Veganism from Two Sisters,” a book she wrote with her older sister, Syl Ko.

Read the article, Black Vegans Step Out, for Their Health and Other Causes, here.

Learn more about Dr. Amie Breeze Harper’s project, Sistah Vegan Project, here.

Aph Ko featured in The New York Times

Black Vegans Step Out, for Their Health and Other Causes, November 2017

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“Aph Ko got tired of hearing that eating vegan was something only white people did. So in 2015, she created a list of 100 black vegans for a website. It included pioneering figures like Dick Gregory and Coretta Scott King and younger, less famous writers, filmmakers, cooks and activists. “When you say ‘vegan,’ a lot of people tend to only think of PETA, which doesn’t reflect the massive landscape of vegan activism,” said Ms. Ko, 28, a Floridian whose favorite dish at the moment is the spinach pie in “The Vegan Stoner Cookbook.” “The black vegan movement is one of the most diverse, decolonial, complex and creative movements.” So many other people wanted to be included on the list after it appeared, she started a website, Black Vegans Rock. That spawned a Twitter hashtag (#blackvegansrock) and a T-shirt business. In June, she published ”Aphro-ism: Essays on Pop Culture, Feminism, and Black Veganism from Two Sisters,” a book she wrote with her older sister, Syl Ko.

Read the article, Black Vegans Step Out, for Their Health and Other Causes, here.

Learn more about Aph Ko’s project, Vegan Anti-Racist Changemaker, here.

Keith Tucker featured in The New York Times

Black Vegans Step Out, for Their Health and Other Causes, November 2017

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“Aph Ko got tired of hearing that eating vegan was something only white people did. So in 2015, she created a list of 100 black vegans for a website. It included pioneering figures like Dick Gregory and Coretta Scott King and younger, less famous writers, filmmakers, cooks and activists. “When you say ‘vegan,’ a lot of people tend to only think of PETA, which doesn’t reflect the massive landscape of vegan activism,” said Ms. Ko, 28, a Floridian whose favorite dish at the moment is the spinach pie in “The Vegan Stoner Cookbook.” “The black vegan movement is one of the most diverse, decolonial, complex and creative movements.” So many other people wanted to be included on the list after it appeared, she started a website, Black Vegans Rock. That spawned a Twitter hashtag (#blackvegansrock) and a T-shirt business. In June, she published ”Aphro-ism: Essays on Pop Culture, Feminism, and Black Veganism from Two Sisters,” a book she wrote with her older sister, Syl Ko.

Read the article, Black Vegans Step Out, for Their Health and Other Causes, here.

Learn more about Keith Tucker’s project, Oakland Hip Hop Green Dinner, here.

Beth Koigi featured in TechMoran

Kenya’s Majik Water to harvest drinking water from air for off-grid communities, November 2017

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“Founded by Anastasia Kaschenko, Beth Koigi and Clare Sewell, Kenya’s Majik Water has launched a prototype and started its water harvesting process in pilot to help people in off-grid communities in Kenya harvest water from air using simple techniques and equipment. The three-girl team, comprising of Clare, who previously worked as a strategic consultant for 9 years in London and  has for the past two years been living in Malawi where she started her own startup, Anastasia who worked for a company that is leading in dew harvesting as well as product research and development in Canada and Beth, a water entrepreneur in Kenya met in Silicon Valley where they realized they shared the same vision to help solve the water shortage issues around the world.

Read the article, Kenya’s Majik Water to harvest drinking water from air for off-grid communities, here.

Learn more about Beth Koigi’s project, Technologia Mashinani, here.

Sara Trail featured in Modern Patchwork

Quilting As Commentary-A look at The Exhibit “Quilta And Human Rights”, November 2017

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“TEXTILES HAVE ALWAYS BEEN CONNECTED TO ACTIVISM, from suffragists sewing protest banners to Hmong refugees in Southeast Asia embroidering images of war onto story cloths. The intersection of quilt making and human rights is explored in a traveling exhibit currently at the Pick Museum of Anthropology at Northern Illinois University.”

Read the article, Quilting As Commentary-A look at The Exhibit “Quilta And Human Rights”, here.

Learn more about Sara Trail’s project, Social Justice Sewing Academy, here.

Mona Yadav featured in Sulabh Swachh Bharat, India

THE COURAGE TO QUESTION, November 2017

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““Bhaiya, why do you think a boy asking for a sanitary pad is frowned upon?”, asked Nisha in an unperturbed fashion. There was no mincing of words. For a moment, I was taken aback. I was meeting Nisha for the first time. She is a 14 year old, and lives in JJ Colony of Dwarka, Sector-3. She is currently studying in Grade 9 of Sarvodaya Kanya Vidyalaya, Dwarka, Sector 3. For her age, Nisha has surely understood the baseless taboo created around the sanitary pads. “After all, it is a part of female biology”, she adds.
Nisha, along with 25 other girls, is attending the month long workshop by Sahas, an organisation creating a space for conversations around gender issues. All the girls are in the age group of 12-14 years and are comfortably sitting in a circle, which also comprises of Mona, Purvi and Vineet. Mona and Puvi have co-founded Sahas last year. Vineet is a professional with NABARD and is volunteering with Sahas for last 6 months. Today, the girls are discussing the social construct of gender, existing gender roles in society, and their inconspicuous impact on our psyche. “

Read the article, THE COURAGE TO QUESTION, here.

Learn more about Mona Yadav And Purvi Yadav’s project, Sahas, here.

Mickey Rowe featured in The New York Times

The World Really Is a Stage, Scripts and All, to an Actor With Autism, November 2017

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“Early Thursday morning at the cafe across the street from Syracuse Stage, an actor named Mickey Rowe ducked in from the drizzly chill just as a barista unlocked the door. Starring as Christopher Boone in Simon Stephens’s “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time,” he had a matinee to perform in a couple of hours, and an interview to give first. On Broadway, where the play was a Tony Award-winning hit, it ran eight times a week, with two actors alternating the demanding role of Christopher, a 15-year-old with autism who sets out to solve a mystery. In Syracuse, Mr. Rowe — thought to be the first openly autistic actor to play the role — does all nine shows a week.”

Read the article, The World Really Is a Stage, Scripts and All, to an Actor With Autism, here.

Learn more about Mickey Rowe’s project, Art on the Waterfront, here.

Nuela Ononiwu featured in The Cultural Curator

NASTY WOMAN: Nuela Adanna Ononiwu (Founder, InspireIT), November 2017

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“Nuela Adanna Ononiwu is getting down to business – and her ‘business’ is to see more girls & women participating in the world of STEM (science, technology, engineering and math).  With her initiative, InspireIT, Nuela is thinking globally, as she works steadfastly to ensure that young women see their futures in STEM as a viable career path. InspireIT comes by its name honestly, offering programming, resources and mentorship opportunities that are sure to change the face of STEM for future generations of women.

Read the article, NASTY WOMAN: Nuela Adanna Ononiwu (Founder, InspireIT), here.

Learn more about Nuela Ononiwu’s project, STEM Club, here.

Olympia Auset featured in Tidal Magazine

Girl Crush: Olympia Auset, November 2017

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“For many people, buying a tomato is a special event. While you may be among those who casually swing by Whole Foods or your local farmer’s market when you get a hankering for some veggies, 23.5 million Americans have little to no access to fresh produce. Olympia Auset was one of those Americans. A long-time vegan, the 26-year-old healthy eating advocate discovered that maintaining a plant-based diet in her Inglewood neighborhood was, “a mission,” as she puts it. “I spent hours on the bus each time I needed groceries because fast food and liquor stores were the only options around me,” she says.

Read the article, Girl Crush: Olympia Auset, here.

Learn more about Olympia Auset’s project, SÜPRMRKT, here.

Sara Trail featured in Quilting Arts Magazine

Craftivism, Taking a Stand with Needle and Thread, October  2017

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“At the turn of the century, before 9/11 happened and the world seemed a more predictable place, Betsy Greer had a notion to use her knitting talents to help worthy causes, donating the things she made to people in need. Within a couple of years, she and her knitting circle had dubbed the term for her quiet method of activism “Craftivism.” “

Read the article, Craftivism, Taking a Stand with Needle and Thread, here.

Learn more about Sara Trail’s project, Social Justice Sewing Academy, here.

Umra Omar featured in The Guardian, UK

The-Guardian-logoWhen the boat comes in: the Safari Doctors of Kenya – in pictures, October 2017

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“In the remote islands in Lamu, near the Kenyan-Somali border, aid groups have stopped working and infrastructure is crumbling as conflict escalates between the military and al-Shabaab fighters. The medical team from Safari Doctors, often under the watchful eye of founder Umra Omar, travel long distances by boat, and by road and air, to bring free medical care to the islands’ increasingly isolated people

Read the article, When the boat comes in: the Safari Doctors of Kenya – in pictures, here.

Learn more about Umra Omar’s project, Safari Doctors, here.

Deja Powell is a Brower Youth Award Winner 2017

Brower Youth AwardsDejah Powell, CHICAGO, IL, October 2017

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“Last year, Dejah Powell founded Get Them to the Green (G2G), an organization that aims to foster love for the environment among Chicago youth, particularly youth of color. Powell’s first project with G2G was to organize a summer camp, through which she engaged 14 young people from across the city on issues like environmental justice, sustainability, and food and agriculture. G2G has since partnered with the non-profit Gardenneers to build a school garden at Powell’s elementary school to provide hands-on, outdoor environmental education opportunities for students, and has organized environmental education workshops throughout the city.

Read the whole article, Dejah Powell, CHICAGO, IL here.

Learn more about Dejah Powell’s project, Get Them to the Green, here.

Steve Barr featured in the Fractured Atlas Blog

Meet the Project: Drawn To Help, September 2017

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“What is Drawn to Help?

Drawn To Help takes the joy and healing power of cartoons to children in hospitals. We’re an all-volunteer organization that brings professional cartoonists to treatment facilities in seven states now, with more expansion on the horizon. We do group activities where we teach the kids how to draw their own cartoons and conduct individualized bedside visits. Each child Drawn To Help serves gets a free packet of nontoxic, latex-free art supplies that they get to keep. That way they can continue to experience the powerful impact of creative activities long after our volunteers have gone home.”

Read the whole article, Meet the Project: Drawn To Help, here.

Learn more about Steve Barr’s project, Cartoon Classes for pediatric patients, here.

Kelsey Crowe featured in Tonic.com

Now’s the Right Time to Learn How to Be More Empathetic, August 2017

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“A sex workers’ stilettos. Flip-flops belonging to a dwarf. The rainboots of a mother whose teenage daughter was the victim of a horrific stabbing. A traveling exhibit called “A Mile in My Shoes” allows you to literally step into each of these pairs of footwear while listening to an audio recording of the owner’s voice. It’s all part of the Empathy Museum, a series of participatory projects that aims to help people see the world through different eyes. And it just might work: Though there’s some evidence our baseline level of empathy is innate or even encoded into our genes, research has shown training and deliberate practice can enhance our capacity for recognizing, acknowledging, and even feeling others’ pain. In fact, a recent meta-analysis of 18 randomized controlled trials—the gold standard of medical studies—supports the effectiveness of formal training programs to increase empathy levels.”

Read the article, Now’s the Right Time to Learn How to Be More Empathetic, here.

Learn more about Kelsey Crowe’s project, Help Each Other Out: Share What Works, here.

Aimee Dunkle featured in California Health Report

A Mother Lost Her Son to an Overdose, and Went on a Mission to Flood Orange County with Naloxonen, August 2017

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Every Saturday afternoon, Aimee Dunkle stands behind Santa Ana’s City Hall with a framed picture of her son, Ben, as she hands out brown paper bags filled with kits of the opioid overdose-blocking drug Naloxone—a medication she says will save the lives of hundreds, if not thousands, of Orange County residents. As Dunkle worked on a recent Saturday, a woman approached her with tears in her eyes. “I just wanted to say thank you,” she said, explaining that the Naloxone she got three weeks ago saved her son from overdose. “If it wasn’t for that stuff he’d be dead.” Another man shuffled towards her, his head hung low, and asked  not for Naloxone, but for encouragement before he turns himself in to jail the next day. He has seen Dunkle every Saturday for the past year-and-a-half, and through her training, he has used Naloxone to revive ten people after overdose.

Read the whole article, A Mother Lost Her Son to an Overdose, and Went on a Mission to Flood Orange County with Naloxone, here.

Learn more about Aimee Dunkle’s project, The Solace Foundation Of Orange County, here.

Aimee Dunkle featured in Patch.com

Solace Foundation Brings Hope For Hopeless In Face Of Opioid Addiction, Overdose, August 2017

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Ben Dunkle was 20 years old when he overdosed on heroin, leaving his family in indescribable pain. Mother Aimee Dunkle found herself without a son, and now spends Saturdays with her Solace Foundation helping the children of others recognize the signs and symptoms of heroin overdose and providing life-saving measures in the form of Naloxone. Ben, is more than a statistic found in the “Opioid Overdose and Death in Orange County” report released Tuesday by the Orange County Health Care Agency. He is Aimee Dunkle’s reason. Reading between the lines of the technical report, one will find Orange County nonprofits such as The Solace Foundation and the Orange County Needle Exchange Program. Both bridge the gap between opioid abuse and overdose, providing empathy for those in need.

Read the whole article, Solace Foundation Brings Hope For Hopeless In Face Of Opioid Addiction, Overdose, here.

Learn more about Aimee Dunkle’s project, The Solace Foundation Of Orange County, here.

Milton Oboka featured in African Excellence, Kenya

Dare to be a force of nature, leave a legacy. Milton Oboka, August 2017

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“It goes without say that every person should intend to work towards protecting our planet and conserve its natural resources. Without doing this, we deny every living thing an improved quality life. I met with the fearless Milton Oboka who is passionate about environmental conservation. Together with his friends, they founded One Vision Kenya in Migori County, Kenya.”

Read the article, Dare to be a force of nature, leave a legacy. Milton Oboka, here.

Learn more about Milton Oboka’s project, Greening The Mind, here.

Chiara Eisner featured in Inkline.com

OncArt: When cancer education meets art, August 2017

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” In a study by Cancer Research UK, cancer has taken the lives of 8.2 million people worldwide in 2012, and 23.6 million new cases of cancer are projected to occur by 2030. Over half of the deaths caused by the disease come from countries with a low level of Human Development Index (HDI), a measure of life expectancy at birth, education level, and a nation’s gross national income. It can be deduced from the aforementioned data that the least developed countries are also those that are more prone to the disease – whether it be because of their lack of basic medical supplies or because of traditions or misinformation that interfere with accessing available medical treatment.”

Read the whole article, OncArt: When cancer education meets art, here.

Learn more about Chiara Eisner’s project, Oncart, here.

Olympia Auset featured in Forbes

This 26-Year-Old Entrepreneur Founded SÜPRMARKT To Address The Food Desert in South LA, July 2017

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“As a South LA native and practicing vegan, 26-year-old Olympia Auset had a difficult time finding organic groceries that fit her diet’s requirements. With approximately 1.3 million people living in South LA, there are only 60 grocery stores across the region. These numbers represent a “food desert,” where healthy food is scarce and preventable disease rates are higher, disproportionally impacting the African American community, shares Auset. This is why Auset founded SÜPRMARKT, a pop-up organic grocery store and subscription service, to serve the local community of South LA. 

Read the article, This 26-Year-Old Entrepreneur Founded SÜPRMARKT To Address The Food Desert in South LA, here.

Learn more about Olympia Auset’s project, SÜPRMRKT, here.