Exchange connects Seattle Black liberation to Hong Kong Umbrella movements, January 2015

seattle globalists“As a 17-year-old in 1950s Seattle, Mark Cook attended the predominantly white Queen Anne High School, where he was only one of three African-American students. An adult white cashier had refused to serve him at lunch. He responded by breaking a window, and was later arrested at his home. A juvenile court decision committed him to a mental institution for an indefinite period of time. This was the moment, he says, that his politicization began.”

“Decades later, Cook would form the first prison chapter of the Black Panther Party at the Walla Walla State Penitentiary. Now 78 and a revered Seattle prison abolitionist, he flew to Hong Kong earlier this month to share with Umbrella activists about the growing liberation movement he started inside prison walls. As part of a series of three talks through the first week of January, Cook spoke to an audience whose situations demanded resistance: those who are poor, and those who’ve survived police violence and been incarcerated themselves after demonstrating in the Umbrella protests. The talks were part of an exchange planned by Pacific Rim Solidarity Network (PARISOL), with hosting support from the Asian Pacific Mission for Migrants (APMM).”

Read the whole article, Exchange connects Seattle Black liberation to Hong Kong Umbrella movements, January 2015 here.

Learn more about Jane Mee Wong here.